Thursday, March 20, 2014

Dialogue between Benjamin Franklin and the Gout

     The Oxford Book of American Essays features works that have expired copyrights. I've been having great fun loading my birthday Kindle with free books. Benjamin Franklin wrote this piece at Midnight, 22 October, 1780.
     He prefers a sedentary life.
     Madame Gout, as he calls it, lists his infractions: ... your amusements, your recreation, at least, should be active. You ought to walk or ride; or, if the weather prevents that, play at billiards.  . . . While the mornings are long, and you have leisure to go abroad, what do you do? Why, instead of gaining an appetite for breakfast, by salutary exercise, you amuse yourself with books, pamphlets, or newspapers, which commonly are not worth reading. Yet you eat an inordinate breakfast, four dishes of tea, with cream, and one or two buttered toasts, with slices of hung beef, which I fancy are not things the most easily digested. Immediately afterwards you sit down to write at your desk, or converse with persons who apply to you on business. Thus the time passes till one, without any kind of bodily exercise. But all this I could pardon, in regard, as you say, to your sedentary condition.
     But what is your practice after dinner? Walking in the beautiful gardens of those friends with whom you have dined would be the choice of men of sense; yours is to be fixed down to chess, where you are found engaged for two or three hours! This is your perpetual recreation, which is the least eligible of any for a sedentary man, because, instead of accelerating the motion of fluids, the rigid attention it requires helps to retard the circulation and obstruct internal secretions. Wrapt in the speculations of this wretched game, you destroy your constitution. What can be expected from such a course of living, but a body replete with stagnant humors, ready to fall prey to all kinds of dangerous maladies, if I, the Gout, did not occasionally bring you relief by agitating those humors, and so purifying or dissipating them?
     If I was in some nook or alley in Paris, deprived of walks, that you played awhile at chess after dinner, this might be excusable; but the same taste prevails with you in Passy, Auteuil, Montmartre, or Sanoy, places where there are the finest gardens and walks, a pure air, beautiful women, and most agreeable and instructive conversation; all which you might enjoy by frequenting the walks. But these are rejected for this abominable game of chess.
     Franklin. Oh! ehhh!- It is not fair to say I take no exercise, when I do very often, going out to dine and returning in my carriage.
     Gout. That, of all imaginable exercises, is the most slight and insignificant, if you allude to the motion of a carriage suspended on springs. By observing the degree of heat obtained by different kinds of motion, we may form an estimate of the quantity of exercise given ...
     You can find "the rest of the story" in The Great American Essays.

     And that, dear reader, is a tour of history.

2014 Red Convertible Travel Series

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