Wednesday, September 07, 2005

Monet's Happy Work


Posted by Picasa MSN photo They were just water lilies, except to Monet, and I am so glad. Every time I look at my umbrella, I see what he saw, and sense his happiness.

Monet's home in Giverny, France, is one of the happiest places I've ever visited. I would love to have a yellow kitchen like his with the blue Japanese art he collected. I'm working up to it. We painted egg yolk yellow on each of the five carved panels of our kitchen doors, and bright blue one-inch blocks on the base boards. Hey, it's a start.

I bought Monet's Table to study the menus and see pictures of his home and gardens. Oh, to have masses of fresh flowers to choose from would make my day. And the meals were a production, un-American. I'd like to have fresh game and produce prepared each day - mouth watering. I clutch my book and dream.

Monet's family made ice cream. We did too, and sometimes with clean snow. Today's snow is grimy, not even good for rubbing down with after a hot tub visit. Peaches were added to Monet's recipe. We're enjoying fresh peaches sliced and in cobblers. I'm thinking Baskin Robbins has the ice cream freezer. If they make peach, I could spread a blanket under our shade tree, eat peach ice cream, and think happy Monet thoughts; a perfect day.

Working as a cable lady, when I saw someone on a blanket in the yard reading or taking tea, I had to stop and visit. Sure enough, they were from another country. Outdoorsy, closer to nature, more natural in appearance and ways, Yugoslav refugees said nature alone remained familiar. In spite of the trauma of war, their minds were in tact. I did meet one who was here physically, but his mind didn't make the trip. God help him.

A collection of Monet's works from around the world were displayed at "The Art Institute of Chicago" in 1998. My sister, my daughter and I attended. Over 90% of what influences us is unseen. Monet's happiness flooded our souls uplifting us. When he started losing his sight, we could feel his frustration. His happy work convinced me that if I'd just do what I love, others could benefit from my happy: writing. I'm doing it. I'm doing it.

The day we crossed his little arched bridge, so did Japanese visitors. They'd come to admire his work as he had admired theirs. Peace through water lilies.

verse copyright 2005 Red Convertible Travel Series

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